Krakow, Poland

I knew early on that I needed to get to Poland at some point during my stay here.   For one thing, I wanted to visit every country that borders Germany, and Poland was the last shared border country on that list.  For another thing, my father’s father was born in Warsaw, so I’m partly Polish.

If I was going to visit Poland, I had to choose a city.  My top two choices were Krakow and Warsaw, and everything I had read indicated that Warsaw wasn’t all that different from any other major city.  Off to Krakow I went!

My hotel was only two short blocks from the Main Market Square.  This is the largest medieval European square, covering roughly 40,000 square meters.  Plus, it has a giant head.

Not pictured:  Me, re-enacting that scene from Clash of the Titans.


In the middle of the Market Square is a building called the Cloth Hall.  The original structure dates back to the 13th century, but it was rebuilt in the 16th century after the previous iteration was destroyed by fire.


Inside the cloth hall are rows of merchants, mostly selling to tourists.


The Market Square has a ton of pigeons.  They were creepy as hell.


One more view of the Cloth Hall, this time from the back and with a nifty fountain in view.


This is a slightly different view of the same building.  This view shows the Town Hall tower, which you can climb.


If you should choose to climb it, be aware that the steps in this tower are very tall steps, and the passageway is very narrow.  Good view from the top, though.


The old town hall’s tower is still standing, even though the rest of the town hall is gone.  There’s a brass sculpture next to the tower showing what the original structure looked like.


All the extra crap in that last picture is because there was an enormous stage set up in the Square for some big event while I was there.  Lots of live music, some of which was even good.


…but I digress.  In the main square, there are often a bunch of these walking around in various languages:


Pick one and follow them.  They cover a lot of interesting topics.  Most of the free tours will lead you down this street, past the McDonald’s and toward St. Florian’s Gate.


St. Florian’s Gate is part of the city’s defensive walls from the 13th century.  There used to be a moat, but that’s gone now. There were originally 47 observation towers and seven gates, because Krakow was a medieval fortress at the time.


Near the gate is this excellent statue of Jay Garrick the Roman god Mercury.


Through the gate is the Barbican, a circular fortification which was originally connected to the main gate.  Barbican is not the name of the building, it’s the name of the type of structure- but I don’t think the locals call it by another name.


Let’s go back to the Market Square, because I’m not done there.  In one corner is this pretty nifty church, the Church of St. Mary, sometimes referred to as St. Mary’s Basilica.  The church is not parallel to the square, and the towers are not uniform.  The reason for the different towers is that the smaller tower is a bell tower, and the higher tower has always belonged to the city and was used as a watchtower.


Every hour, on the hour, a small window is opened in the watchtower, and a short trumpet signal called the Hejnał mariacki is played.  The trumpeter then opens a different window and repeats the call.  This is done four times in all, in four directions which roughly correspond to the direction of the four main Krakow city gates.


The tune breaks off very abruptly.  It is not known with certainty why this is so, but one of the most persistent legends is that it is cut off to commemorate a 13th century trumpeter who was shot in the throat while sounding the alarm before a Mongol attack on the city.  Here’s a short video of the trumpet signal.

In another corner of the Market Square is another amazing (but much, much smaller) church called St. Adalbert’s Church. Legend says this is the location where St. Adalbert used to preach.

Every night, the Royal Chamber Orchestra does an amazing one hour concert in this church.  The baroque dome gives it excellent acoustics, and the show is well worth seeing.   The program alternates, and when I saw it, the song  included such venerable classics as Schubert’s “Ave Maria,” Gershwin’s “Summertime,” and Horner’s “Love Theme from Titanic.”


Walking south out of the main Market Square, along Grodzka, you eventually come to an intersection with two more interesting churches visible.    I can’t remember the name of this one.


This one is the Church of St. Francis of Assisi, the Franciscan church.


Across the street from the Franciscan church is the Bishop’s Palace, where Pope John Paul II stayed whenever he was in the city.  They even decked out the window he used to hang out of to permanently commemorate this.


Between the two churches is another interesting sculpture showing where the Church of All Saints stood in the past.


At this point in the post, the “walking around the city” narrative sort of breaks down, because the last few pictures aren’t in a straight line.  For example, this is the former Collegium Physicum, the location for the faculties of pharmacology, physiology, physics, chemistry, and geology.  Lots of science was done here.


…and this is the Collegium Maius, the oldest existing building of the Jagiellonian University.  I didn’t get to see that wonderful clock in motion, but my city map said it runs at 11am, 1pm, and 3pm every day.


This the real gold roof of the cathedral on Wawel Hill, near the castle.  It’s plated though, and not solid gold, because that would be too heavy.


I took a brief stop in Wawal Castle to view Leonardo da Vinci’s Lady with an Ermine.  It was smaller than I expected.  The classics almost always are.  Alas, photographs were forbidden.  After I was done looking at the painting, I noticed this fascinating giant balloon from the courtyard.


This is the Hiflyer.  It’s based a reasonable walk from the city center, and as long as the weather is good, they’re flying.  They recommend calling ahead just to be sure, but a reservation isn’t necessary.  The balloon is more or less stationary, because it’s tethered to a single place on the ground.


The “basket” for this is actually a very large metal ring, with an open center for the cable that pulls you back down at the end of your flight.


Going up at dusk affords you some pretty spectacular views of the area.  This direction shows Wawel Hill, including the castle.


On my last evening in town, I stopped at one of the restaurants in the main market square and I had these fresh pierogies.    I love pierogies, and having a chance to have freshly made ones in Poland is not to be missed.  These were so, so delicious.


Have you ever been to Krakow?  Have you ever had a pierogi?

13 thoughts on “Krakow, Poland

  1. Mmm, food looks good! I always wanted to travel around the world just to be able to eat all the different kinds of food.
    You should have photographed the looks of the people around you while you re-enacted that scene from Clash of the Titans. You think they’re used to it by now?


  2. Amelie

    Two pop culture references in one post. *gives you points*

    I had many pierogi meals in Pittsburgh, including flash fried ones and pierogi pizza. Pierogi pizza is kinda bland and strange, but fried pierogi are yummy.

    The giant head-picture is, both, amazing and terrifying.


  3. The first ‘university’ picture shows actually the courtyard of the castle. And my favourite pic is the one with the baloon and the tower.


  4. Of course you went up in the balloon thing, well done! Looks like a great tour, guess I’ll have to make a third trip to go see more of the things we missed out on.

    And oh man… the pierogies… The first time I went, my two roommates were with me, and one had a university friend living in Krakow doing his Ph.D. He took us to this tiny place buried in the Jewish Quarter, and we had the most insanely good dinner. There’s no way I could find it again (and stupidly didn’t take pictures of it or anything), but I shall forever remember those pierogies.


  5. Barbara Wissinger

    Dear Steven,

    I just stumbled across your entry for Kraków. My daughter and I are going there next week, so thanks for the photos. I lived in Regensburg for a few years (yeah Vanderbilt-in-Germany), but am now based in Erding. Wishing you the best upon your return to the States.

    Barbara Wissinger


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